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Bipod question


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#1 Rick Pierson

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 08:45 PM

I have been looking for a nice bipod for predator hunting in MN. I have been looking at bog pod sp2c bipod with the rubber strap to hook over your gun to hold it from falling or tipping over. Do any of you use one, or have better ones I should look at?

#2 Red

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 05:08 AM

I can see why the rubber strap would be nice. On the other hand many times I've had coyotes show up close from an unexpected direction where a quick off hand shot is required. The last thing I'd want in that situation is a cumbersome bi-pod dangling from my rifle.

At one time I used Harris bi-pod and that's why I stopped using one that's attached.


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#3 mongochicago

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 07:23 AM

    Also had a Harris bipod.  Found it to be more of a hassle adjusting it than a benefit.   Switched to a Caldwell shooting bag for a rest.   Not as portable, but much more solid of a rest.



#4 Red

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 11:23 AM

To be clear, I still use a bi-pod. Mine has adjustable legs, but it does not attach to the gun in any way. Prior to this I used home made sticks. Killed a lot of coyotes with those but height adjustability wasn't too good.


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#5 Rudy

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 03:57 PM

I use a Caldwell field pod for prairie dogs and sometimes for deer. The biggest difference in my setup is that I use K-P Industries Flex III Knee Pads and kneel while hunting. The reason is that I can maneuver easily in any direction from a kneeling position without causing too much motion. Movement is what most game animals will detect. I grasp the field pod with my left had and push forward slightly to brace myself for the shot. I also use shoes with stiff soles so I can sit back on my heels. It's not uncommon to walk a few yards on my knees to get a clear shot.



#6 muddyfox

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 08:06 AM

I do a lot of Prairie dog hunting, make a couple trips a year to the Dakotas. Purchased a shooting tripod from Cabelas that can be made into a bipod or single shooting stick. Also use it for coyote hunting here in Minnesota. Works out great for both. Last year purchased a Muddy shooting table for Prairie 

dogs and it worked out way better than expected. Realize not highly portable but sure works great for dog hunts.



#7 Alan

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Posted 21 December 2018 - 04:46 AM

I'e used sticks (bi-pod) for years, and they work well for me. However, where I do most of my shooting, there are a lot of trees, as in pecans. This device, although expensive, has paid for itself many times over.

 

http://wickedairrifl...oad-system.html



#8 Plumas

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Posted 24 December 2018 - 02:33 PM

That little horizontal claw is a great idea for tree areas, I'm going to check it out for denser forest adventures...I can see it for tree squirrels at high angles...thanks for sharing that!

 

I have made various bi and tri-shooting sticks and they work pretty well, but my son spent the bucks (I never would have)...and I now own the tall tripod, Gen 3 Trigger Stick.

Heavier compared to a bi-pod but not so much that I don't use them as a walking stick and that trigger height adjustment (one step rather than 3) is just too slick to ever be without, pays for itself with each deployment especially when one leg needs to be way short or long due to terrain slope. 

 

Anyway, truly the extra stability plus not having to balance the sway of a bi-pod for a more mature sportsman such as myself pays off big time.