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Scopes - FFP: First Focal Plane versus SFP: Second Focal Plane

Scopes First Focal Plane Second Focal Plane

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#1 davidbradford

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 11:58 AM

I have a question regarding FFP First Focal Plane versus SFP Second Focal Plane scopes. Can anyone add to the pros and cons of each of these reticle types?

 

FFP Pros

 

Reticle scales with magnification 

 

FFP Cons

 

Cross hairs widen with magnification

 

SFP Pros

 

Cross hairs do not widen with magnification

 

SFP Cons

 

Reitcle does not scale with magnification

 

Thanks,

 

David


Edited by davidbradford, 24 April 2015 - 11:59 AM.


#2 Spud

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Posted 24 April 2015 - 02:17 PM

Second focal plane scopes are the best, but you will find that they are much more expensive.  Normally SFP have much better glass, I have one of new low price Nightforce scopes and it is one of the best scope I own, I like it so much that I change it to different rifles depending on what I calaber I am shooting.

 

Spud



#3 davidbradford

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 12:03 PM

Thanks spud. I have also heard by reading the US Optics FAQ that with FFP scopes the material from the reticle can flake and obscure the view. They do cover that on the warranty but they say that after a while the flakes settle down and go away.



#4 Spud

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 12:10 PM

Here is the scope I purchased, I know that even this is there low price scope they are still a little pricey.  If you have time go on the nightforce web site and read about them.

Spud

SHV™ 5-20×56 RIFLESCOPE



#5 davidbradford

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Posted 25 April 2015 - 12:14 PM

Thanks Spud.



#6 flylo

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Posted 04 May 2015 - 02:05 PM

I've been very happy with SWFA brand scopes, quality & sevice.


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#7 MarinePMI

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Posted 07 May 2015 - 03:52 AM

If I may disagree, quality FFP scopes typically cost more than the same quality SFP scopes (just compare the prices of similar Nightforce scopes; FFP typically cost more).  

 

The value of the FFP scope is that the reticle calibrations remain constant across the power range.  For typical hunting conditions (under 300yds), a ranging reticle is not really required.  Since your "point blank" zero is generally good enough to kill most large game in the US, the ability to adjust for an inch or two is not really required.

Where FFP scopes come into play (and value) is the long range, multiple target at multiple ranges environment.  This is typically the type of shooting used on two legged varmints or steel; hence why these are usually used by military and PRS-type shooters.  The ability to have accurate hold over (as well as push for wind) is important when the target has limited exposure or you have a limited amount of time to engage.  Also, if time constrained, engaging multiple targets at long range (say at 675, then 540, then at 740yds) is greatly aided by a calibrated reticle, relieving the shooter from having to dial in elevation and wind between each shot.

 

As to the reticle flaking, that may be an issue specific to USO.  Most quality FFP scopes these days have the reticles chemically etched onto the lens so there is no fading, flaking or broken cross hairs.  It's also really the only way to have some of the more complex reticles (Horus H59, Mil-R, MOAR etc.).

 

The Con to FFP scopes is that the reticle can become very small at low magnification, making it hard to make out the intersection of the cross hairs or in some cases, hard to see in low light (hence many have illuminated reticles).  As stated earlier, the other Con is they tend to be a bit a pricey, and have a lot more moving parts.

 

SWFA does make some good glass, both in SFP, FFP and fixed power.

 

Bushnell and Vortex are really giving NF, USO and S&B a run for their money with the release of VERY competitively priced FFP scopes.  Granted, these are still in the $1000-$2500 range (not cheap by any stretch of the imagination), but well below the current $3800 for a NF Beast or Schmidt Bender PMII.

 

As to which is better?  It really has more to do with shooter preference and the type of shooting you're doing; the right tool for the right job so-to-speak. (This same discussion could be had with regards to MOA/Mil versus Mil/Mil scopes.)

 

JMTCW...


Edited by MarinePMI, 07 May 2015 - 04:03 AM.

MarinePMI
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