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Stainless Galling


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#1 Surgikill

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 02:21 PM

Hi guys I have a few questions. The first thing is about stainless guns. I have a Ruger m77 hawkeye predator in 22-250 in stainless and it seems to gall alot when I am cycling the action. I was wondering if I could polish the bolt with brasso or a similar polishing compound to prevent or lessen the galling effect. I also read that only similar substances will gall, so would I be correct in assuming that if there was a carbon steel receiver and a stainless bolt that they would not gall, or would I be wrong?

Edited by Surgikill, 21 February 2012 - 02:24 PM.


#2 fredhorace77

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 08:24 PM

Hi guys I have a few questions. The first thing is about stainless guns. I have a Ruger m77 hawkeye predator in 22-250 in stainless and it seems to gall alot when I am cycling the action. I was wondering if I could polish the bolt with brasso or a similar polishing compound to prevent or lessen the galling effect. I also read that only similar substances will gall, so would I be correct in assuming that if there was a carbon steel receiver and a stainless bolt that they would not gall, or would I be wrong?


try some of wheeler eng. lapping compound comes in 3 different grits i would use the finest one to start out with and see how it goes...

#3 sixshooter

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 09:09 PM


Hi guys I have a few questions. The first thing is about stainless guns. I have a Ruger m77 hawkeye predator in 22-250 in stainless and it seems to gall alot when I am cycling the action. I was wondering if I could polish the bolt with brasso or a similar polishing compound to prevent or lessen the galling effect. I also read that only similar substances will gall, so would I be correct in assuming that if there was a carbon steel receiver and a stainless bolt that they would not gall, or would I be wrong?


try some of wheeler eng. lapping compound comes in 3 different grits i would use the finest one to start out with and see how it goes...

I am unfamiliar as to what this (galling) is is the bolt binding, chattering?

#4 fredhorace77

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 05:52 AM

i think what he maybe talking about is the receiver is scratching the bolt up or binding up...I know that the receivers of ruger bolt actions are extremly hard and usually the bolt is made out of a little softer stainless material.

#5 Surgikill

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 06:35 AM

When I say it is galling I mean it is sticking or catching when I try to close the bolt. I have some grease that I tried and it cleaned it up a little bit. I may just have to wait for it to break in. Its not scratching the bolt at all, just sticking.

#6 Old Hawkeye

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 09:49 AM

When I say it is galling I mean it is sticking or catching when I try to close the bolt. I have some grease that I tried and it cleaned it up a little bit. I may just have to wait for it to break in. Its not scratching the bolt at all, just sticking.


Been following this thread & based on your last description of what is happening I don't think the problem is what is called galling. Galling is usually associated with semi-auto actions, mainly when the new stainless pistols came out & was caused by the extreme speed of the cycling action between the frame & the slide & the relative hardness of the surfaces. The result of galling is "noticeable" gouging & scratching of the wear surfaces. Later metallurgical techniques have eliminated the problem. I think what you have is "binding". Ruger actions are an investment casting & the bolt lugs are machined resulting in quite a variance in hardness. Add to it that Rugers are a fairly crude, sloppy action with a fairly long throw they will tend to bind unless the bolt is carefully held straight with the action rails. The more it wears in the less this problem will be. I would try the lapping compound & use/cycle the bolt a bunch & see if the problem improves. If that fails, have a gunsmith polish the rails & lug bearing surfaces (not the locking surfaces).

#7 Surgikill

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 12:42 PM


When I say it is galling I mean it is sticking or catching when I try to close the bolt. I have some grease that I tried and it cleaned it up a little bit. I may just have to wait for it to break in. Its not scratching the bolt at all, just sticking.


Been following this thread & based on your last description of what is happening I don't think the problem is what is called galling. Galling is usually associated with semi-auto actions, mainly when the new stainless pistols came out & was caused by the extreme speed of the cycling action between the frame & the slide & the relative hardness of the surfaces. The result of galling is "noticeable" gouging & scratching of the wear surfaces. Later metallurgical techniques have eliminated the problem. I think what you have is "binding". Ruger actions are an investment casting & the bolt lugs are machined resulting in quite a variance in hardness. Add to it that Rugers are a fairly crude, sloppy action with a fairly long throw they will tend to bind unless the bolt is carefully held straight with the action rails. The more it wears in the less this problem will be. I would try the lapping compound & use/cycle the bolt a bunch & see if the problem improves. If that fails, have a gunsmith polish the rails & lug bearing surfaces (not the locking surfaces).



Just curious what type of action do you like the most. I like the rugers because they use a strong Mauser action and have a pretty beefy receiver.

#8 fredhorace77

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 08:14 PM

i personaly stick with remingtons...although my absolute fav. action of all time is the older sako...579

Edited by fredhorace77, 22 February 2012 - 08:15 PM.


#9 Surgikill

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 09:02 PM

I personally don't like Remington's, not because they're not accurate, but because of the bolt mechanics. A buddy of mine is a police sniper and he said that whenever at the training range guys would always end up with the bolt basically welded shut into the receiver, they had to use rubber mallets to extract the shell.

#10 ridenemwild

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 03:22 AM

I don't agree with that statement. If the Remington 700 action locks up then why does the marine corp use a model 700 action for their sniper rifles? Why do many benchrest shooters use a model 700 action when they want to build a competion rifle? The model 700 action just about can't be beaten unless you go with a custom action. I personally own 2 rivers and yes the Mauser type action and claw extractor are nice, affordable, and reliable but just as you are asking about hear the bolt to receiver fit can be a little loose. I recommend lots of rem oil and just work the bolt while you are watching TV this will help break it in some and also you will get the muscle memory to bring it straight back and straight forward.

#11 Red

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 04:27 AM

I personally don't like Remington's, not because they're not accurate, but because of the bolt mechanics. A buddy of mine is a police sniper and he said that whenever at the training range guys would always end up with the bolt basically welded shut into the receiver, they had to use rubber mallets to extract the shell.



I call B.S. on that one. I don't like Remington's either but the action is the best part of them. If the bolt was hanging up on one particular gun it could have been a problem with that gun - or it more likely was a problem with the ammunition used.

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#12 ridenemwild

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 04:47 AM

Ruger not river lol

#13 Old Hawkeye

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 05:38 AM

The rifles I use & prefer are the older L series Sakos. A L46 & L469 from the 50's, a L461, L579 & L61R from the 60's. I also have an AI version of the L461 made in the 80's. The Tikka LSA 55 & M558 are also in my arsenal. I do have a CZ 527 in Hornet, as it's about the only decent action available for that caliber. The Sakos are the finest factory production actions every built, IMHO, & we will never see their like again. After using these rifles EVERYTHING else seems crude & inferior. The Rugchestertons marketed by today's bean counters are an abomination to me & are not allow in my gun safe. But, I'm more picky than most when it comes to rifles.

#14 Surgikill

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 11:28 AM

Red one reason they use he Remington action is because they are cheaper than dirt and have many accessories. And at the range this didn't happen with one particular gun, it happened on a daily basis with many rifles. Just my .02 cents but I won't ever own a Remington.

#15 Red

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 04:21 PM

Red one reason they use he Remington action is because they are cheaper than dirt and have many accessories. And at the range this didn't happen with one particular gun, it happened on a daily basis with many rifles. Just my .02 cents but I won't ever own a Remington.


So then I'm guessing the SWAT/Sniper team is equipped with rubber mallets and a pair of carpenter pants to hang it from. I mean if what you say is true then those rifles should have been returned to Remington and would have been repaired or replaced.

I'm just saying...I owned one, did not like it for several reasons but the action was fine. They are used extensively by police and military and I see them at the range all the time. They are widely used whether or not you and I like them. So far I've never seen anyone beating one opened or closed with a freakin mallet. A tight bolt usually means there is excessive pressure. Did anyone bother to inspect the brass for pressure signs?

Personally I try to stay away from ANY bolt action centerfires that start with the letter "R". But if I found a 700 action as cheap as you say they are, I might rethink that.

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