Jump to content

Photo

204 Ruger or 17 Remington


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 dave19113

dave19113

    Varminter

  • Member
  • 18 posts
  • Local time: 11:17 PM
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 September 2011 - 05:28 AM

Was thinking of getting either a 17 Remington or 204 Ruger but could not decide which one to go with. I like the idea of the 204 but I do not like the idea of going with overlapping rounds. I have 22LR 22 Hornet 223 Rem 243 Win and I am not sure where the 204 fits in. I was originally thinking of a 17AH because I wanted something that was quiet like the 22 hornet and had good economy when it came to powder usage but the fire forming and the price of dies do not appeal to me. I am looking to get some feed back on both rounds. The ballistics seem good on both. Powder useage is about the same. I will be going with a encore barrel.


Thanks

Dave

#2 Eric Mayer

Eric Mayer

    Varminter

  • Admin
  • 3,274 posts
  • Local time: 08:17 PM
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 September 2011 - 08:48 AM

There is a rumor being bantered about that Hornady will be coming out with a factory 17 Hornet. What type of hunting are you going to use this for?

Let us know!

Eric B)

#3 dave19113

dave19113

    Varminter

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 18 posts
  • Local time: 11:17 PM
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 September 2011 - 11:27 AM

For those calibers its all ground hogs crows and so forth plus just target fun.... Plus I love handloading so loading for these smaller loads have always been fun.... If they did come out w a 17 hornet i would jump on the band wagon asap.

My biggest thing is I always stayed away from fire forming just bc I never liked to buy throw away bullets to set up a case. If the 17 hornet was more like a 373jdj or something like that where I could just run it through a sizer, trim and be done I would be more interested.

#4 Eric Mayer

Eric Mayer

    Varminter

  • Admin
  • 3,274 posts
  • Local time: 08:17 PM
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 September 2011 - 01:06 PM

If you are just shooting ground hogs and other varmints, I would go with the .204 Ruger. Much more reach and "wow" factor after a hit. Don't get me wrong, the .17 Remington is a lightening bolt, but it does not have the reach the .204 Ruger does. For example, I was shooting cottontail rabbits on a depredation permit at an alfalfa ranch up in Central California. There were a stack of pallets next to one of the fields that had dozens of cottontails hiding within them. Our shooting distance was 530 yards and a couple of us were using the .17 Remington. We were having to hold almost 4 feet high and when the bullet hit, we didn't know for a few seconds until the rabbit keeled over due to blood loss. The energy of the 25 grain bullet was only about 140 ft lbs at that distance. Now, let's pretend I had a .204 Ruger shooting a 40 grain V-Max. I would only have to hold about 25 inches or so over (assuming a 1/2 inch high at 100 yards sight-in) and the bullet would have almost 3 times the energy the .17 Remington would.

Pop a nice, high-power scope on the gun and start cleaning up some varmints!!

I know a few of the guys on here shoot the .204, so I hope they chime in with their experiences.

Eric B)

#5 dave19113

dave19113

    Varminter

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 18 posts
  • Local time: 11:17 PM
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 September 2011 - 02:24 PM

If you are just shooting ground hogs and other varmints, I would go with the .204 Ruger. Much more reach and "wow" factor after a hit. Don't get me wrong, the .17 Remington is a lightening bolt, but it does not have the reach the .204 Ruger does. For example, I was shooting cottontail rabbits on a depredation permit at an alfalfa ranch up in Central California. There were a stack of pallets next to one of the fields that had dozens of cottontails hiding within them. Our shooting distance was 530 yards and a couple of us were using the .17 Remington. We were having to hold almost 4 feet high and when the bullet hit, we didn't know for a few seconds until the rabbit keeled over due to blood loss. The energy of the 25 grain bullet was only about 140 ft lbs at that distance. Now, let's pretend I had a .204 Ruger shooting a 40 grain V-Max. I would only have to hold about 25 inches or so over (assuming a 1/2 inch high at 100 yards sight-in) and the bullet would have almost 3 times the energy the .17 Remington would.

Pop a nice, high-power scope on the gun and start cleaning up some varmints!!

I know a few of the guys on here shoot the .204, so I hope they chime in with their experiences.

Eric B)

I like the sound of that.... Plus the availability of barrels for the Encore are nice. I remember a few years ago TC had barrels for the 17... Ive looked around and cant seem to fine any other than the custom makers. What is the recoil like?. Not that Im worried about it but I like a caliber that I can see the impact of the bullet. With my Contender in 223 with a 23" heavy barrel, I lose the sight picture. Im figuring that on my encore with a 26 or 28" barrel it should be non existent.

Also, what weight bullets should I be looking at ? 35-40gr.?

#6 ridenemwild

ridenemwild

    Varminter

  • Member
  • 193 posts
  • Local time: 10:17 PM

Posted 28 September 2011 - 02:30 PM

.204 all the way. You can see ur impacts and bullets are readily available. Hornady offer 25,32,40 and 50 grain bullets and Im sure other companies offer some diffrent options. I prefer the 32s myself. Still over 4000 fps and plenty of knockdown too.

#7 dave19113

dave19113

    Varminter

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 18 posts
  • Local time: 11:17 PM
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 September 2011 - 02:33 PM

.204 all the way. You can see ur impacts and bullets are readily available. Hornady offer 25,32,40 and 50 grain bullets and Im sure other companies offer some diffrent options. I prefer the 32s myself. Still over 4000 fps and plenty of knockdown too.



How is the barrel life if you are cranking em at 4000?

#8 Red

Red

    Sniper

  • Moderator
  • 13,031 posts
  • Local time: 10:17 PM
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 September 2011 - 07:00 PM

32 grain bullets are fast in the 204 but if you're wanting long range the 39 or 40 grain bullets are the way to go. Since you're buying a new barrel, you might try to get one with a faster twist than the standard 1-12. With a 1-11 or 1-10 you can be confident it will stabilize the 39 and 40 grain bullets. The 12 twist will generally stabilize the 39's though.

I've never used the 50's so I can't say...and could not get the 45's to shoot well. I did not stick with them very long.

If your typical shooting distance was say 350 yards or less, I doubt it matters much as far as 17 or 204. The 17 was originally a fur takers caliber so I could only imagine the results would be somewhat less dramatic as I've never used one.

2 other options, since you already have 223 brass, Tac 20 or 20 Practical. Personally, that 20 Practical is appealing and would be very simple and effective. Neck it down and shoot.

#9 WTFC

WTFC

    Varminter

  • Member
  • 873 posts
  • Local time: 10:17 PM
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ham Lake, MN

Posted 29 September 2011 - 05:58 AM

My biggest thing is I always stayed away from fire forming just bc I never liked to buy throw away bullets to set up a case.


No need to throw away bullets for fire-forming. I have a 7-30 Waters 14 inch barrel for my T/C Contender. When I fire-formed cases for it, I bought the cheapest bullets I could find because I thought I would just be throwing them away. Turned out that one of the best groups I've shot was using those cheap bullets. So, don't throw them away, use them to shoot varmints! :biggrincamo:




7-30 Waters Edited 2.jpg

#10 dave19113

dave19113

    Varminter

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • 18 posts
  • Local time: 11:17 PM
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 September 2011 - 08:02 AM


My biggest thing is I always stayed away from fire forming just bc I never liked to buy throw away bullets to set up a case.


No need to throw away bullets for fire-forming. I have a 7-30 Waters 14 inch barrel for my T/C Contender. When I fire-formed cases for it, I bought the cheapest bullets I could find because I thought I would just be throwing them away. Turned out that one of the best groups I've shot was using those cheap bullets. So, don't throw them away, use them to shoot varmints! :biggrincamo:




7-30 Waters Edited 2.jpg

Wow....that group isnt too bad

#11 ridenemwild

ridenemwild

    Varminter

  • Member
  • 193 posts
  • Local time: 10:17 PM

Posted 29 September 2011 - 10:32 AM

Those are hornady factory loads. I have never heard of a 204 being shot out although I'm sure its possible. If I understand it right the 204 was designed to prefom like a 22-250 but have a much longer barrel life. Hornady list the velocites of the 32s at 4225 and the 25s at 4400 now that's smoking!

#12 Red

Red

    Sniper

  • Moderator
  • 13,031 posts
  • Local time: 10:17 PM
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 September 2011 - 03:25 PM

yep my Ackley shot better groups with fireforming loads than it did with the improved case :lol: just not as much steam behind it.

Shooting groundhogs, crows, and such it would take a really long time to shoot out a 204 barrel. Prairie dogs or some other high volume shooting where the barrel will get hot is another story.

#13 thescrawler

thescrawler

    Varminter

  • Member
  • 40 posts
  • Local time: 08:17 PM

Posted 15 November 2011 - 02:20 AM

That seems to be the key to all rifles. Dont let the barrel get too hot and you will conserve life considerably. The 204 is a wonderful round, though it runs into the same limitations as the 17 rem as far as wind and rain are concerned. Mine is a Ruger 77 Mark II and out of the box with factory loaded 32's punched one hole at 100. And it opens a little wider range as far as bigger game goes, effective on coyotes out to 400 or so. Happy shopping :biggrincamo: