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What's Your Opinion Of Coyote Drives?


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#1 deathwind II

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 06:02 PM

They're becoming a disturbing trend in my area (central OH.) We do have some coyote, but I've not seen or heard of livestock predation for a couple of years, or of any kids attacked or pets being munched on. Most are taken from tree stands during deer season; I intend to ramp up my coyote hunting to more than the once-a-year happenstance shot I get at one while out farming or hunting groundhogs, but realistically, don't expect to be the next Byron South.
At the risk of sounding like a bunny-hugger, where is the "fair chase" ethic in drives? We're not talking three or four hunters spread out over a large area, but a dozen or more guys in a relatively small area. Shudder to think what type/caliber of firearms these amatuers use to dispatch the animals with; I'd hazard a guess that any that are able to escape are wounded future stock-killers or die a slow death.
Also, such scortched-earth "hunting" could very easily upset what predator/prey balance there is around here, where the real pests are the whitetail deer.
I this state coyote hunting is pretty much unrestricted: c-fire rifles and almost-unlimited times. We don't need to draw attention of the PETA's and Anti's and their legislators.

#2 ShooterJohn

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 06:55 PM

This is the first I've heard of these drives. Of course the we do have aerial hunting of coyotes out West which I don't care for. I'm not sure drives would be anywhere near as effective as the aerial hunters either. Coyotes are smarter than most people give them credit for. That's why they're expanding their range so successfully and we aren't running out of them.

#3 doghog

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 08:27 PM

Common practice with sheep ranchers since the beginning of time, sheep hungry coyotes can become high dollar, use to be when somebody killed a coyote on a sheep ranch you could take it to the rancher and if it had wool between its teeth he might pay you a little.
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#4 Jbotto

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 09:58 PM

yep they are happening. i have a beef-farming neighbor who wages war on the coyotes during calving time. he sets up a bunch of guys to watch a couple square miles of pastureland and field land. i noticed that the coyotes seem to drop into the creek and escape from view. every year they manage to kill a couple but never any good numbers. i'm pretty sure that most of the guys use centerfire rifles and they are shooting at any coyote they see. this drive/push takes place within about two miles from a town. i've always wondered the safety issues here but idk all the guys involved.

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#5 ShooterJohn

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 10:24 PM

I guess sheep need protection. Can't see trying to cover the wide open spaces out west with a drive though. Might be more successful back east. But then they don't have as many coyote hunting events back east either. rolleyes.gif

#6 doghog

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 05:23 PM

^^ thats because town is blocking your line of sight, working ranches are fenced usually in 1 or more sections at a time so if you have a coyote killing in a certain pasture you set snares where you think he's coming under get some blockers and then drive the pasture horseback then if you still cant get him you can call Animal Damage Control (ADC) and they will send the plane with a shooter and its over for the coyote.
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#7 TA17 rem

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 09:00 PM

In some areas the coyotes don't respond well to calling so they have to be trapped or hunted like you mentioned above or the hunters in perhaps youre area don't know how to call them or like to do it the old fashioned way...
I hunt and call coyotes and have spent a little time spotting for aireal gunning. None of the methods are 100%, some coyotes do escape and live for another season..
Where i live we hunt them with a group of guys, we work as a team and safety is always kept in mind. We have modified our methods some compared to deer drives.. One or two hunters go into a section on a fresh track and the rest have a position where they sit and can see the area. The trackers get first chance at the coyotes, they try to jump them from there bed or shoot them while still in it. If they miss and the coyote gets by them then the other hunters that are spread out in key locations get a crack at them before or after they cross the road. Our coyotes are not chased by trucks or snow machines and are not shot from either also. But here it is legal to shoot from a road as long as you don't interfear with flow of traffic.. The way we hunt is very effective, we take from 100 coyotes a year or more, but we don't get them all. Some are left for seed so we have more for the next year... All we are trying to do is keep the numbers in check nothing more..
Some may not agree with the way we hunt but thats the way it is and its legal here.. When i have the time i go farther west and do my calling where coyotes are more responsive, wish they where here but thats the way it goes sometimes.. Good hunting T.A.

#8 ShooterJohn

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 09:04 PM

It would sure be nice if people put where they are from in there profiles so you know where they're talking about.

#9 TA17 rem

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 05:15 AM

This type of hunting is done mostly in the Midwest Like Mn., Iowa, wisc, Ohio,. You go a little farther west then its done with pick-ups and snow-machines.

#10 TA17 rem

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 05:16 AM

This type of hunting is done mostly in the Midwest Like Mn., Iowa, wisc, Ohio,. You go a little farther west then its done with pick-ups and snow-machines.

#11 gunrac

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 10:35 AM

Grain farmer's around my area are becoming more an more reluctant to give permission to yote hunt. There seeing the g-hog population dwindling down in some pretty big number's.

We use to have good population's of rabbit an fox. Far an few any more. I'd like to see all the yote's dead!

Drive's are very produtive when the snow's on. Here in central Ohio, most of the counties are chopped up into 1 and 2 mi. block's.
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