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BIPODS!


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#1 w00t_Masta

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 06:21 AM

Another Question by the newb.

Well I decided i'm going to buy (probably have the $ in 4 months) a Stevens 200 in .223, and paint it camo. Leaves me a good looking accurate gun, with the ability for some upgrades (SSS trigger).

But im wondering about Bipods. Swiveling/pivoting/360 degrees, etc..... what does yours do, and what do you wish it did? What lengths do you prefer, and what brand would you suggest buying.

thanks again, it's always a pleasure soaking up your experience, i really appreciate it.

w00t

#2 chunks7mm

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 08:14 AM

i use a harris.......alot of people use a swivel type.....i dont...but thats my preference.....another good "clone" is the stoney point....a little less money and good setup

edit....maybe its a shooters ridge...cant remember

Edited by chunks7mm, 29 July 2007 - 08:15 AM.


#3 faucettb

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 08:20 AM

I've been a coyote and ground squirrel shooter for 45 years or so. I've got to say I don't like the bipods that make you lie down on the ground to shoot. I do however like a sit down bipod. The one I use along with some shooting sticks I made from Varmint Al's plans on his website work very well.

Here's what I use for my bipod. It swivels and just clips on a nylon ball on the front sling swivel attachment. One problem I've found with the metal bipods that hang on the front sling swivel is that you may have to glass the swivel in because of the weight and pressure these apply to your forarm. I've fixed several that have broken thru the stock.





As I get older I've been taking a very careful look at this new portable shooting aid. One problem faced with coyote sets is sometimes it's hard to see over the grass. Sometimes I take a folding chair and that helps, but this may be a solution.



#4 Red

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 08:34 AM

I use the short BR length bi-pod for prairie dogs from the bench or at the range. Harris or Shooters Ridge with the pivot. Shooting sticks for coyotes cause it's more versatile, and nothing attached to the rifle in case I need to take an offhand shot.



Who makes this one faucettb ?
QUOTE (faucettb @ Jul 29 2007, 11:20 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Here's what I use for my bipod.



#5 TJD

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 09:53 AM

As you can see no one type will work in all cases. I like Harris products. For shooting at the range I use the Solid Mount style in the 9 to 13 size rather than a front sand bag because I can adjust the rifle to a plum/level condition. For field use I like the Swivel Mount style in the 12 to 25 size. For tall grass or brush the tall extendable types are best, or you can make one. See Varmint Al's plans.

#6 17ghogkiller

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 10:09 AM

I use the harris bi-pod adjustable from 13 to I believe 24 inches. It is the model H with no swivel. With this I can either shoot prone or sitting by adjusting the legs in or out. The bi-pod does not interfear with off-hand shooting nor does it add alot of weight. I shoot prone as much as possible. I tried shooting sticks, but for right now I will stick to the bi-pod.

#7 Driftin

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 12:30 PM

Harris swivel 12-25. Gotta have the sit/kneel capability. Puts line of sight above sagebrush, rocks, etc. I use it on any rifle, and for big game. Extends accurate range way out there. Without it, would have missed big ones due to range and heaving lung syndrome. Swivel helps with tracking and followthrough. Provides easy rifle rest so you don't have to lay it on the ground or lean it into some shrub. Try finding your rifle in the middle of 100 square miles of high desert when it's camoed up and laying on the ground, and you're returning with your truck to pick up a big carcass. Drawbacks? Some added weight, but varmint rifle's already hefty, so no big diff. Besides, missing with a light rifle with no bipod is a bigger drawback. Bipod can unscrew sling stud if bipod isn't mounted well.

#8 w00t_Masta

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 01:20 PM

Thanks for the help guys.

So some of you use carry your bipods then clip them on when you see a target? seems like a pain. I think the extending ones would suit me best. Probably something that swivels as well.

And when you say "doesn't interfere w/off hand shooting", is it out and hanging or folded back to the stock?

thanks,

w00t

#9 chunks7mm

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 02:04 PM

i put mine with legs facing towards the muzzle.....other way i would think it would interfere with offhand shooting

#10 faucettb

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 02:26 PM

QUOTE (w00t_Masta @ Jul 29 2007, 02:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Thanks for the help guys.

So some of you use carry your bipods then clip them on when you see a target? seems like a pain. I think the extending ones would suit me best. Probably something that swivels as well.

And when you say "doesn't interfere w/off hand shooting", is it out and hanging or folded back to the stock?

thanks,

w00t


The clip on bipods or shooting sticks are something you set up and use on a coyote set or when your shooting ground squirrels. Their usually carried on a clip on your belt. None of the bipods are much quicker to set up even the fold up ones that attach to a stock or a pair of shooting stick clipped to a belt.

Most times if you see a coyote, deer or any game that's moving your not going to have time to set up a clip on bipod or unfold and adjust a bipod thats fastened to the stock. Sometimes your don't even have time to get into a more stable shooting position such as sitting or kneeling. Calling on the other hand is where you have time to set up and find a comfortable place to set down and hook up your bipod, shooting sticks or put the legs down if using a fold up bipod. So neither offer a speed advantage.

The bipods that hook to a stock unless extremely short such as the lay down style are a pain in the behind for me to carry and add a bunch of weight to the rifle. Because they fold along the forearm of the stock thay also make shooting offhand, kneeling or sitting almost impossible. That's my personal opinion and I've got friends whom like them. If your hunting and spot game at long ranges then your probably going to have the time to set up either style and it just ends up your personal preference.

Some folks like a bipod for shooting off a bench rest, but I like bags better and even better good bench rest rifle holding devices.

#11 JP 2 Alpha

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 03:13 PM

harris, had the same one for 4-5 years never had a problem.

#12 chalmitch

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 04:59 PM

I have had a few brands. The Harris is the best, even on a .22 LR. To me there is no need for the swivel option. For field work you may want the 12"-25" version. For taller grasses go with the stick on VarmintAl. For bench work sand bags are the best, Uncle Bud's are fabulous and heavy when filled.

Best regards,
chalmitch

#13 Red

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 05:27 PM

To each his own.

I like the pivoting bi-pods because the portable bench is rarely set up on level ground and I'm constantly moving the rifle from one side to the other. It's much easier to simply pivot the bi-pod rather than adjust the height of the legs on the non pivoting type each time I move the rifle to re-level it.

As far as off hand shooting goes, when a coyote busts in from an angle you never expected (which happens to me all the time) and you're sitting in heavy cover...no time to fold them up...the last thing I want are two dangling brush catchers attached to the rifle. That scenario happened to me on more than one occasion and I've missed coyotes because of it. I've done it both ways, with the bi-pod and with the sticks, I prefer the sticks most of the time. I imagine in open country where you're not nestled into a thicket the bi-pod might be preferable...I don't know?

#14 SD Handgunner

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 06:25 AM

For shooting from a Bench I prefer the Harris BR Model 6" to 9". I have two Harris BR Model Rigid Bipods and 1 Harris BR Model Swivel Pipod. For Accuracy Testing I much prefer the rigid version, for shooting gophers or prairie dogs off of a portable bench that is not always level I prefer the swivel version.

I have tried a Shooters Ridge Low Swivel Bipod (9" to 13"). While this Bipod looks like the Harris that is where the similarity ends. The Shooters Ridge is lighter and flimsier in my opinion. I am not certain but I think the tubing in the legs of the Shooters Ridge is thinner than that of the Harris.

When it comes to Calling Coyotes I much prefer a set of crossed shooting sticks for the same reasons already listed.

Larry

#15 w00t_Masta

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 08:34 AM

After reading Varmint Al's page I'm going to start w/ his Bi-Fur-Pod's, then if they don't suit me i will buy something else.

thanks for the info guys,


w00t